A Love Letter from a Writer to their Novel

Dear Novel,

What can I say? It was love at first thought. You popped into my head and I was infatuated, excited and my heart was giddy. You consumed myvintage_love_letters every thought. And then we began our love affair and it was joyous. Every word tripped from my pen or fingertips like they were new. I wanted to be with you every day, to the exclusion of all else.

That was in the beginning. But all relationships change and so has ours. You’re still in my thoughts, every spare moment of every day. I’m sick with you. I can’t sleep. But there you sit, unchanged. You don’t seem to want to be with me so much anymore. There are times when I feel like I’m alone in this relationship. It’s difficult, but I believe in us. I won’t give up.

To my main protagonist – I know sometimes I make things seem pretty shitty, but it will all work out in the end. Okay, maybe it won’t, but it will be a beautiful, firey journey and it will make you a hero. I chose you, out of all the other characters and just because I make things difficult for you, doesn’t mean I don’t love you.

So dear novel, even though it’s tough, I think we’re worth the effort. I may never get money or recognition in return, but that’s not why I write you. I write you because I have to, because I can’t not write you, because you’re meant to be written. So,when we next meet, let’s make it easier. Let’s stick together and see this through to the end.

Yours forever,

the author

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4 thoughts on “A Love Letter from a Writer to their Novel

  1. Writers everywhere will feel a pang as they read this, Chella. It’s true, all true, an elegant tale for Valentine’s Day. I only bought my wife a new car battery. I don’t think that hit the mark.
    Great Post.

    Like

  2. I really like this. And so appropriate, given the date. It’s a great way to describe the relationship us writers have with our labour of love, and how it starts out so all-consuming, then sheer hard work, once the ‘honeymoon’ period ends.

    Nice analogy, Chella.

    Like

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